Internet abuzz as Harvard sees 5% drop in applications following antisemitism scandal and SCOTUS' affirmative action ruling

Internet abuzz as Harvard sees 5% drop in applications following antisemitism scandal and SCOTUS' affirmative action ruling
Harvard University witnessed a significant drop in undergraduate applications for the class of 2028 (Getty Images)

CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS: Harvard University, one of the world's most prestigious institutions of higher learning, continues to face significant setbacks as it grapples with the aftermath of a series of controversies that have tarnished its reputation.

In a striking development, the Ivy League school witnessed a 5% drop in undergraduate applications for the class of 2028, marking the fewest applications received since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, as per the New York Post.

Harvard University received only 54,008 undergraduate applications for the upcoming academic year

According to the latest figures released by Harvard, the university received 54,008 applications for the upcoming academic year, marking the fewest applications since 2020. 

1,937 students were accepted to the class of 2028, making the admission rate 3.58%, which is slightly higher than 2023's rate of 3.41%.

The controversies that have plagued Harvard can be traced back to a letter signed by 30 student groups, which accused Israel of being "entirely responsible" for the October 7 Hamas attacks and the succeeding war.

 (Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)
Claudine Gay resigned from her position as the Harvard president over plagiarism allegations (Getty Images)

Subsequently, Claudine Gay faced backlash for her handling of campus antisemitism during a congressional testimony as the Harvard president. 

The situation escalated further when she was forced to resign in January after multiple plagiarism claims surfaced against her. Her resignation marked a significant blow to the university's leadership, adding to the growing concerns about Harvard's commitment to academic integrity and inclusivity.

Notably, the class of 2028 represents the first admissions cycle since the SCOTUS' landmark decision to end affirmative action in higher education. The June 2023 ruling deems it unconstitutional for colleges to give students extra consideration based solely on their race.

Internet reacts to the drop in Harvard University's undergraduate applications

One quipped, "Go Woke, go broke!" while another succinctly remarked, "Oh well. They played, they paid."

A person opined, "Harvard's crown fell off," and someone else echoed, "Harvard has become a joke."

"Good. Maybe they’ll learn a lesson," noted an individual. 

One more compared Harvard's situation to the Dylan Mulvaney-Bud Light fiasco, writing, "Not quite a Bud Light level crash but a good start."

"Harvard has become an overly expensive community college of mediocrity... just a 1st amendment opinion," stated a disgruntled netizen. 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 

This article contains remarks made on the Internet by individual people and organizations. MEAWW cannot confirm them independently and does not support claims or opinions being made online.

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