Bad Bunny sues concertgoer for posting his songs on YouTube, seeks up to $150K per song for copyright infringement

Bad Bunny sues concertgoer for posting his songs on YouTube, seeks up to $150K per song for copyright infringement
Bad Bunny is currently on his Most Wanted Tour with a concert scheduled in Los Angeles (Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA: Singer Bad Bunny has initiated legal action against a concertgoer, aiming to secure up to $150,000 per song in a copyright infringement lawsuit, reports said.

The lawsuit has been filed in a federal court in California against Eric Guillermo Madronal Garrone, the founder and owner of the YouTube channel MADforliveMUSIC, NBC News reports. 

Bad Bunny seeks almost $150K for every song posted by Madronal Garrone on YouTube

The outlet mentioned that Bad Bunny is seeking up to $150K for every song recorded and posted by Madronal Garrone on his YouTube channel. 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA - OCTOBER 14: In this image released on October 14, Bad Bunny performs onstage
Bad Bunny is seeking $150K for every 10 songs recorded and posted by Madroñal Garrone on his YouTube channel (Getty Images)

The complaint alleges that the videos showcase numerous complete songs by Bad Bunny, performed during his concert at the Delta Center in Salt Lake City on February 21.

It also mentioned as of Thursday, March 14, 'MADforliveMUSIC' YouTube channel was not available. It also remains unclear if his channel was monetized. 

His TikTok and Instagram accounts, which seem to be linked to the MADforliveMUSIC YouTube channel, however, remain active as of Thursday, March 14, the outlet noted. 

Bad Bunny's takedown request for 'unauthorized bootleg' responded with counternotice 

The publication mentioned, citing the lawsuit, that the videos contained “unauthorized bootleg” footage that violated Bad Bunny’s copyrights.

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA - OCTOBER 14: In this image released on October 14, Bad Bunny performs onstage
The complaint alleges that the videos showcase numerous complete songs by Bad Bunny, performed during his concert at the Delta Center in Salt Lake City on February 21 (Getty Images)

 

Bad Bunny then was prompted to submit a takedown request through YouTube to have the videos removed. However, Garrone Madronal responded to the request by issuing a formal counter-notice.

He defended his right to post the videos, citing freedom of expression and arguing that the footage demonstrated a “newsworthy event of high public interest."

Bad Bunny is currently on his 'Most Wanted Tour' with a concert scheduled for March 14, in Los Angeles. 



 

YouTube is unable to proceed with the takedown request unless Bad Bunny responds with legal action

The complaint states that after Madronal Garrone replied, YouTube informed Bad Bunny that it could not move forward with his takedown request without a response containing proof of legal proceedings, as evidenced by the documentation attached to the complaint by Bad Bunny's legal team.


 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by BAD BUNNY 🐰 (@badbunnyprnation)


 

Even as Madronal Garrone's YouTube channel MADforliveMUSIC was not available on Thursday, March 14, the outlet mentioned he did not have any attorney listed according to court records. 

Court records, according to the publication, also show Madronal Garrone was notified about the lawsuit on Monday, March 11.

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